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About
Chabad offers a vibrant and nurturing community where hundreds of students choose to engage in Jewish life! A welcoming and vibrant community, Chabad is a wonderful way for students to experience Judaism while in college.

We provide a plethora of Jewish opportunities for the campus community, including family-style Shabbat dinners that typically attract well over a hundred students, along with educational classes, social programs and pro-Israel activities. We have facilitated Birthright Israel trips for more than 1000 WashU students. Through the Chabad Student Association, we offer students the opportunity to lead our programs. As part of the campus safety net, our professional team helps provide support, guidance and referrals.

Chabad also offers programs and resources for graduate students as part of the JGrads initiative. Students at local colleges, including UMSL, SLU, Webster U., and St. Louis Community College, are supported by The Network.

We look forward to welcoming you at the Chabad House, at any of our programs on campus, or just to meet over coffee.
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Shabbat & Holidays
Candle Lighting Times
Saint Louis, MO 63105
Weekly Torah Portion
Upcoming Holiday
Sep. 25 - Sep. 27
Learning & Inspiration
  • Life Through the Lens of KabbalahThe Rebbe’s father saw kabbalistic significance in every event in his life. Was this a humble... Read More
  • Does My Son Need a Traditional Bris?Is there a substantive reason to have a circumcision performed by a mohel, rather than a doctor?... Read More
  • Be Like a Bee!Like the bee who buzzes around and collects nectar, we, too, are tasked with moseying about and... Read More
Daily Thought
He made you hungry, He made you starve, He fed you manna… (Deut. 8:3) Torah could only be given to people who had consumed manna. (Midrash Tanchuma 20:2) It wasn’t that manna didn’t satisfy hunger. Manna was food, nourishing food. But it was food that caused you to feel dissatisfied. That was its nourishment. Your manna might have tasted to you like a succulent grilled steak. But it was a spiritual, not a tangible experience—and that left you yearning for something beyond that experience, something a physical body could never really have. This was crucial to the plan. As the rabbis taught, “The secrets of Torah can be transmitted only to one whose heart troubles him incessantly from inside.” That is, after all, the experience of studying the hidden wisdom of Torah—the experience of always feeling “this is not yet it.” The perpetual sense that the truth lies just beyond. Yearn, always yearn to know. Never be satisfied. Then you have true life. Maamar Vayancha Vayarivecha 5723